All posts by Joe Sniezek

Interactions @scale for monitoring air

The next BostonCHI meeting is Interactions @scale for monitoring air on Tue, Sep 13 at 6:45 PM.

Register here

BostonCHI September 2022, featuring Karen Donoghue

Abstract:

What does it mean to monitor air quality at scale? What are some of the human-computer interface design challenges to be solved to enable citizen scientists to monitor their local air quality at scale?  What other impacts does scale have in designing data-intensive air quality monitoring experiences for consumers?

In this talk, Karen will discuss her current work on designing and developing Local Haze, an air quality monitoring product for citizen scientists and air quality enthusiasts that currently monitors over 30,000 sensors across six continents. In addition, Karen will cover some of the challenges she has faced in getting a new product to market while maintaining “ease of use” at the core of a growing product offering. For more information, please visit https://humanlogic.com/

Bio:

Karen Donoghue (HumanLogic) is a seasoned interaction designer with her own global consulting practice. She collaborates with product teams on discovery, conducts ideation for concept development, and performs requirements validation. Clients include Google, VMware, T-Mobile, SecurityScorecard, Beyond Identity, Olympus, Imprivata and many early-stage startups. Karen earned an MS at the MIT Media Laboratory in Cambridge, MA, USA and is the author of two business books about user experience.

Schedule – EDT (UTC-4)

6:45 – 7:00: Networking (via Zoom)

7:00 – 8:00: Presentation

8:00 – 8:30: Q & A

The gameful life: Game design for the new 50+ year old player

The next BostonCHI meeting is The gameful life: Game design for the new 50+ year old player on Tue, Jun 14 at 6:30 PM.

Register here

BostonCHI June 2022, featuring Bob De Schutter

Abstract:

The 50+ year old demographic is about to take center stage within the audience of digital games. Today, a 65-year-old retiree would have been 18 when Pong arrived and even a 50+ year old has already lived through 4 console generations before turning 25. This presents a major cultural shift for the game industry, as older players of today and tomorrow will now often have a strong cultural connection to digital games, which they have cultivated throughout their lives. The shift from mostly uninformed novices to many savvy gaming literates among older players presents game academia and both the entertainment and gamification industry with a few challenges and many opportunities, as older players are looking for design approaches beyond brain training or fall prevention games.

In this talk, I will introduce how the topic of games and aging has inspired my work as a scholar and a game designer for over 15 years. I will debunk familiar stereotypes that surround 50+ year old players, and I will outline how aspiring game developers can make better games for aging players.

Bio:

Bob De Schutter (MFA, PhD) is an award-winning game designer, researcher, educator, and advocate for meaningful play in later life. He is a Professor of Applied Game Design at Northeastern University, where he is jointly appointed between the College of Arts, Media and Design and the Khoury College of Computer Sciences. He is also the owner of award-winning game company Lifelong Games (LLC).

Schedule – EDT (UTC-4)

6:30 – 6:45: Networking (via Zoom)

6:45 – 7:45: Presentation

7:45 – 8:15: Q & A

What has Architecture Learned about Integrating User Needs, Post-Pandemic?

The next BostonCHI meeting is What has Architecture Learned about Integrating User Needs, Post-Pandemic? on Tue, May 10 at 6:45 PM.

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BostonCHI May 2022, featuring Erin Corcoran

Abstract:

As We Emerge from the Pandemic – What has Architecture Learned about Integrating User Needs?

Almost exactly two years ago I spoke to BostonCHI about how Architects are integrating user research into their design projects, and the methods and tools we use to gather both qualitative and quantitative data to inform the design of buildings and cities. In the time since that talk, our practice has evolved – both in the tactical tools we utilize in a world where in-person interaction was severely limited, and in how our designs have responded to changing user expectations.

I am looking forward to reconnecting with the BostonCHI community to present on what aspects of spatial design we are rethinking, what has emerged as guiding principles, and how the demand for user research has increased – both to help our clients make informed decisions in an ever-changing world, but also for us to get a pulse of shifting needs from a variety of stakeholders across our projects.

Beyond the high-level trends, I will present a few case stories:

  • Research studying the impact of the Hub on Causeway development on Boston’s Bullfinch Triangle
  • How workplace design and return to work strategies have become entwined
  • How user-engagement has adapted to digital within Architectural Practice

Bio:

As a Strategy Lead and an Architect, Erin is obsessed with how people use, interact with, and impact space. I’m also fascinated by how humans connect with each other, how we communicate and behave, and how we come together.

With Gensler’s Boston’s team, Erin works to develop human-centric strategies for complex space and cultural challenges, working with public and private sector workplace clients, building owners and developers, post-secondary education groups, healthcare institutions, community organizations and many others.

Schedule – EDT (UTC-4)

6:45 – 7:00: Networking (via Zoom)

7:00 – 8:00: Presentation

8:00 – 8:30: Q & A