Daniel Leithinger – Shape Displays for Remote Togetherness

June 9, 6pm, online

Registration is required.

ABSTRACT

We need physicality in computing now more than ever, and shape displays may help us reclaim it. During this time of remoteness, our daily experience of work and learning is a stark reminder that videos on a flat computer screen cannot replace the intimacy of touch and the feeling of presence when sharing a room. Shape displays challenge this status quo by transforming their physical shape to represent information and people. I will discuss how we can use these interfaces to enrich remote experiences, and what advances will be needed to turn them from lab prototypes into reality. Our research group’s work on prototyping tools for shape-changing interfaces and on new form technologies like shape-changing swarm robots is driven by a shared vision of a future of embodied interaction and remote togetherness beyond pixels. 

BIO

Daniel Leithinger is Assistant Professor (Computer Science and ATLAS Institute) at the University of Colorado at Boulder and head of the ATLAS NYC satellite lab. Together with his students, he creates shape-changing human-computer interfaces that push information past the boundaries of flat displays, and into the real world. Daniel received his PhD at the MIT Media Lab in 2015. His research has been presented at ACM UIST, TEI and CHI, and he has received design awards from Fast Company, Red Dot and IDEA.

SCHEDULE

  • 6-6:30pm: Networking via virtual whiteboard and zoom
  • 6:30pm: Presentation
  • 7:30pm: Q&A

HOW THIS WORKS:

We will be using:

  • A Zoom meeting for the event
  • A Miro virtual whiteboard during the pre-talk networking

Links for both the Zoom meeting and the Miro whiteboard will be sent to registered attendees.

SPONSOR

Thank you to our generous sponsor!

Andrew Kun – Work and Well-being in Cars

Tuesday May 12, 2020

Online (link to be sent day of event)

Please register.

This is a weird time, but we’ve heard from many of you that it’s important to keep the vibrancy of the BostonCHI community alive by continuing to host our monthly events. So BostonCHI is happy to announce that our May event is on!

Please join us for a remote gathering and presentation in Zoom, live from our homes to yours.

How’s this going to work?

We are aiming to keep it fairly simple, tech-wise

We will be using:

  • A Zoom meeting for the event
  • A Mural virtual whiteboard during the pre-talk networking

Links for both the Zoom meeting and the Mural whiteboard will be sent to registered attendees

SCHEDULE

  • 6-6:30pm: Networking via virtual whiteboard and zoom
  • 6:30pm: Presentation
  • 7:30pm: Q&A

ABSTRACT

Today’s vehicles have a myriad of user interfaces, from those related to the moment-to-moment control of the vehicle, to those that allow the consumption of information and entertainment. With recent advances in automated vehicles, there is increased attention to user interactions as they relate to creating a place for work and play during a trip. Given that it is unlikely that most vehicles will be fully automated in the near future, there are also significant efforts to understand how to help the driver switch between different modes of automation. This talk will provide a brief review of these areas of research, and report on our collaborative work on the topic of creating a mobile office in automated vehicles. 

BIO

Andrew L. Kun is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of New Hampshire, and director of the UNH Human-Computer Interaction Lab. His primary research interest is in-vehicle human-computer interaction. He serves as the ACM SIGCHI Interim Vice President for Conferences, as Steering Committee co-chair of the ACM AutomotiveUI conference series, program co-chair of the 2020 ACM Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interactions (TEI) conference, and program co-chair of the 2020 ACM MobileHCI conference.

SPONSOR

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

Erin Corcoran – UX for Buildings: Designing for Users in Architectural Practice

Tuesday April 14, 2020

Online (link to be sent day of event)

Please register.

This is a weird time, but we’ve heard from many of you that it’s important to keep the vibrancy of the BostonCHI community alive by continuing to host our monthly events. So BostonCHI is happy to announce that our April event is on!

Please join us for a remote gathering and presentation in Zoom, live from our homes to yours. Our speaker, Erin Corcoran, will tell us all about how UX is appearing in architecture and building design (more below).

How’s this going to work?

We are aiming to keep it fairly simple, tech-wise

We will be using:

  • A Zoom meeting for the event
  • A Mural virtual whiteboard during the pre-talk networking
  • Live polling during the talk (via Poll Everywhere)

Links for both the Zoom meeting and the Mural whiteboard will be sent to registered attendees

SCHEDULE

  • 6-6:30pm: Networking via virtual whiteboard and zoom
  • 6:30pm: Presentation
  • 7:30pm: Q&A

ABSTRACT

UX for Buildings: Designing for Users in Architectural Practice

Buildings are made for people, at one point described by Le Corbusier as ‘machines for living in’; they are where we work, where we live, and where we play. We’ve all experienced places that felt ‘right’, that we were drawn to, and places that anticipated our needs intuitively, just as we’ve also visited spaces that just don’t work, buildings that are outright unwelcoming or confusing, or places that have negative impacts on our wellbeing.

Good or great spatial experiences don’t happen by chance, and the architectural profession is beginning to utilize a more strategic approach to design, adapting tools and approaches from parallel strategy and UX fields to inform their designs.

This talk will introduce attendees to how UX is emerging within architectural practice, what tools are being utilized to study how people use space and how this data has informed projects, and how the conversation around architecture and its impact on occupants is evolving.

BIO

Erin Corcoran is an Architect and Design Strategist who is fascinated by how humans use space, and passionate about understanding user needs using a mixed analytical and empathy-based design approach.

Currently a part of Gensler’s Boston team, she works to develop solutions to complex space and cultural challenges for public and private sector workplace clients, building owners and developers, post-secondary education groups, healthcare institutions, and community organizations.

A member of the Boston Society of Architects and more recently part of the steering committee for BostonCHI, she is always seeking to expand the conversation and widen her breadth of human-centric design knowledge.

SPONSOR

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

The Human Side of Tech