Uncomfortable Interactions

The next BostonCHI meeting is Uncomfortable Interactions on Tue, Oct 12 at 6:30 PM.

Register here

BostonCHI October 2021, featuring Steve Benford

Abstract:

UX and HCI have typically been concerned with comfortable interactions that are efficient, ergonomic, satisfying, legible and predictable. However, an increasing focus on cultural experiences, from highbrow arts to mainstream entertainment, changes the game. Our experience of artworks is often far from comfortable. Our engagements with games and sports may push our minds and bodies to the limit. I will argue for deliberately and systematically designing uncomfortable interactions to deliver entertaining, enlightening and socially bonding experiences. I will reflect on interactive artworks that have deliberately employed discomfort to create powerful and provocative interactive experiences. I will explore four strategies for designing with discomfort – visceral, cultural, control and intimacy. I will consider how these need to be carefully embedded into an overall trajectory of experience that offers resolution and reflection. Finally, I will consider the ethical challenges of such an approach, revisiting issues of consent, withdrawal, privacy and risk.

Bio:

Steve Benford is the Dunford Professor of Computer Science at the University of Nottingham where he founded the Mixed Reality Laboratory in 2000 and has directed the Horizon Centre or Doctoral Training since 2009. His research explores how digital technologies, and foundational concepts and methods to underpin these, can support cultural and creative experiences. He previously held an EPSRC Dream Fellowship, was a Visiting Professor at the BBC and also a Visiting Researcher at Microsoft. He was elected to the CHI Academy in 2012. His collaborations with artists have also led to the award of the Prix Arts Electronica Golden Nica for Interactive Art, Mindtrek Award and four BAFTA nominations.

Schedule – EST (UTC-5)

6:30 – 6:45: Networking (Using Zoom breakout rooms)

6:45 – 7:45: Presentation

7:45 – 8:15: Q & A

Dark Patterns, Ethical Engagement, and the Potential for Action

The next BostonCHI meeting is Dark Patterns, Ethical Engagement, and the Potential for Action on Tue, Sep 14 at 6:15 PM.

Register here

BostonCHI September 2021, featuring Colin Gray

Abstract:

The strategic goals of organizations increasingly consider the role of user experience, impacting both the design of user interfaces as well as the relationships of humans and society to technology. But while knowledge of user needs and human psychology is generally framed as a means of generating empathy or reducing the divide between humans and technology, this knowledge also has the potential to be used for nefarious purposes. In 2010, scholar and UX practitioner Harry Brignull coined the term “dark patterns” to describe this dark side of UX practice, which I have engaged with over the past five years. In this talk, I will share findings from several studies that address practitioners’ engagement with ethics, using the concept of “dark patterns” as a point of departure. I start with a collection of examples of dark patterns and “asshole designs,” demonstrating the harmful use of manipulative patterns that are increasingly ubiquitous. I then describe the findings of multiple engagements with technology practitioners, detailing the organizational and disciplinary complexities that make it difficult for practitioners to act in ethically responsible ways. I conclude by describing potential impacts on regulations and organizational practices to respond to these threats. I use these studies to build a case for ethical engagement in the education and practice of designers and technologists, pointing towards the need for scholars and educators to address both near-term issues such as manipulation, and longer-term issues that relate to social impact, responsibility, and the potential for regulation.

Bio:

Colin M. Gray is an Associate Professor at Purdue University and program lead for an undergraduate major and graduate concentration in UX Design. He holds appointments as Guest Professor at Beijing Normal University and Visiting Researcher at Newcastle University. His research focuses on the ways in which the pedagogy and practice of designers informs the development of design ability, particularly in relation to ethics, design knowledge, and professional identity formation. His work crosses multiple disciplines, including human-computer interaction, instructional design and technology, design theory and education, and engineering and technology education.

Schedule – EST (UTC-5)

6:15 – 6:30: Networking (Using Zoom breakout rooms)

6:30 – 7:30: Presentation

7:30 – 8:00: Q & A

Community Wellness Informatics: Designing Technology for Health Equity

The next BostonCHI meeting is Community Wellness Informatics: Designing Technology for Health Equity on Tue, Jun 8 at 6:15 PM.

Register here

BostonCHI June 2021, featuring Andrea Parker

Abstract:

In the United States, there are serious and persistent disparities in health outcomes. For example, socioeconomic status is predictive of mortality and disease, with low-SES households disproportionately experiencing health challenges. This inequality is due in large part to the social determinants of health—social, physical, and economic conditions that make it more challenging to achieve wellness in low-SES communities.

Disruptive innovations are sorely needed to reduce health disparities. Information and communication technologies (ICTs), with their growing ubiquity and ability to provide engaging, informative, and empowering experiences for people, present exciting opportunities for health equity research.

This talk will overview a set of case studies demonstrating work the Wellness Technology Lab has done to design, build, and evaluate how novel interactive computing experiences can address issues of health equity. These case studies investigate how social, mobile, and civic technology can help low-SES communities to both cope with barriers to wellness and address these barriers directly. Using findings from this research, I will articulate opportunities and challenges for community wellness informatics—research that explores how ICTs can empower collectives to collaboratively pursue health and wellness goals.

 

Bio:

Andrea Grimes Parker is an Associate Professor in the School of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). She is also an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Parker holds a Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in Computer Science from Northeastern University. From 2018-2019, she was a Northeastern University Institute of Health Equity and Social Justice Research Faculty Scholar. Dr. Parker is the founder and director of the Wellness Technology Research Lab at Georgia Tech. Her interdisciplinary research spans the domains of human-computer interaction (HCI) and public health, as she examines how social and interactive computing systems can be designed to address health disparities.

Dr. Parker’s research has been funded through awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health, the Aetna Foundation, and Google. She served as co-chair for the 2020 Symposium of the Workgroup on Interactive Systems in Healthcare (WISH), and currently serves on the SIGCHI CARES Committee and the Georgia Maternal Health Research for Action Steering Committee. Dr. Parker has received several best paper nominations for her research on health equity.

 

Schedule – EST (UTC-5)

6:15 – 6:30: Networking (via Miro)

6:30 – 7:30: Presentation

7:30 – 8:00: Q & A

The Human Side of Tech