Diving Deep: Uncovering Hidden Insights through User Interviews

  • Susan Mercer, Experience Research Director, Mad*Pow Science
  • Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 6:30pm
  • At Constant Contact, 1601 Trapelo Rd, Waltham, MA 02451
  • Please register.  It helps us and our hosts plan.

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Abstract

User interviews are a great technique for getting to know your target audience. However, sometimes people don’t feel comfortable answering a researcher’s questions with complete honesty. Other times they may not know exactly how to articulate what they need, want, or feel.

We will examine findings from psychology and market research to understand techniques for interviews to help you uncover insights beyond people’s surficial answers. We’ll explore conversation theory, projective techniques such as image associations, collaging, sentence completion, and others to uncover hidden, actionable insights to fuel your designs.

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Re-Centering Human Centered Visualization

  • Lane Harrison, Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Tuesday, February 9, 2016 at 6:30pm
  • At IBM Research Cambridge, 1 Rogers Street, Cambridge, MA
  • Please register.  It helps us and our hosts plan.

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Abstract

Data visualization is making strides in delivering new tools, techniques, and systems to people engaged in data analysis and communication. Providing more options can lead to a paradox of choice, however — how can people creating data visualizations understand the tradeoffs between available designs? One promising approach towards addressing this problem is to better understand and quantify the role of the human in data visualization. In this talk I’ll share some of our recent results ranging from quantifying low-level perceptual processes in visualization, to modeling higher level concepts like engagement and aesthetics. Re-centering visualization on the human not only aids people in designing data visualizations, but also leads to new opportunities for next-generation visualization tools, techniques, and systems.

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Boston Interactions Winter Party 2016

BostonCHI, UXPA Boston, and other usability and interactions groups of Boston, invite you to join us for our annual winter party at The Asgard, 350 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA between Central Sq and Kendall Sq.

Please join us on Tuesday, January 26th, in a private room at The Asgard, a pub restaurant in Cambridge, from 6:00-10:00 PM.

Please register. Space is limited and your name must be on the list to attend.

Food and Drink: Appetizers and hors d’oeuvres will be provided. There will be a cash bar.

Read MoreBoston Interactions Winter Party 2016

Beyond the UX Tipping Point

Joint meeting between IEEE Computer Society, GBC/ACM and BostonCHI

  • Jared M. Spool, Founding Principal, User Interface Engineering
  • Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 6:30 PM
  • At Verizon Labs, 60 Sylvan Rd, Waltham, MA
  • Please register. It helps us and our hosts plan. Also you must be on the guest list in order to attend due to security at Verizon Labs.

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Abstract

For the longest time, making a great experience for the user was a luxury item in a business’s strategy. It was a nice-to-have, after identifying a customer need and fulfilling it with a working product. The product had to work and it had to ship. If it was a great experience, well all the better. Times have changed. The cost of creating and delivering a product is no longer a barrier to entry. Quality is no longer a differentiator. What’s left? The experience of using the product. If you’re going to be truly competitive in today’s markets, your products and services better have a great experience. To do that, a fundamental shift has to occur inside your organization. It’s no longer acceptable to ship a product with a poor experience or to deliver poor customer service. Every part of the organization has to be infused with an understanding of great user experience. Your organization has to cross the UX Tipping Point.

Bio

Jared M. Spool is the founder of User Interface Engineering and a co-founder of Center Centre. If you’ve ever seen Jared speak about user experience design, you know that he’s probably the most effective and knowledgeable communicator on the subject today. He’s been working in the field of usability and experience design since 1978, before the term “usability” was ever associated with computers.

Jared spends his time working with the research teams at User Interface Engineering, helps clients understand how to solve their design problems, explains to reporters and industry analysts what the current state of design is all about, and is a top-rated speaker at more than 20 conferences every year. With Dr. Leslie Jensen-Inman, he is starting Center Centre, a new school in Chattanooga, TN to create the next generation of industry-ready UX Designers. In 2014, the school, under the nickname of the Unicorn Institute, launched a Kickstarter project that successfully raised more that 600% of its initial goal. He is also the conference chair and keynote speaker at the annual UI Conference and UX Immersion Conference, and manages to squeeze in a fair amount of writing time. He is author of the book, Web Usability: A Designer’s Guide and co-author of Web Anatomy: Interaction Design Frameworks that Work. You can find his writing at uie.com and follow his adventures on the twitters at @jmspool.

Evening Schedule

6:30 – 7:00 Networking
7:00 – 8:30 Meeting
8:30 – 9:00 CHI Dessert and more networking!

Sponsors

Vitamin T is sponsoring pizza and dessert.

Getting to the Event

Verizon Labs, 60 Sylvan Rd, Waltham, MA

Design is More Than Lipstick on a Pig

  • Traci Lepore, Principal User Experience Designer, Oracle
  • Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 6:30pm
  • At IBM Research Cambridge, 1 Rogers Street, Cambridge, MA
  • Please register.  It helps us and our hosts plan.

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Abstract

When done well, Design is a fusion of art, science, and technology that builds on visual theories, psychology, sociology, and marketing. This is especially true for User Experience Design. To successfully create and communicate that fusion we need a deeper understanding of the multiple disciplines that actually impact our work and process in order to articulate the reasoning behind our visions and communicate the importance and clarity of the whole Design.

In my other life, theater, a piece of work is called a production. Quite fitting, as there are multiple design aspects from the stage and set design, to costumes, to technical design and lighting design that have to come together to create the experience. And there isn’t one deliverable, but there is one central aspect of the design and that is the script. The script provides the cues for the set, the lighting, the sound, and the costumes. They all have their own means of communication but still work with that core structure.

So why don’t we consider a UX Design a production? There are just as many aspects that must come together to complete the work. I want to explore how we can communicate the “Production of User Experience Design” with its core functional design, its technical design, its visual design, and its strategic design as a whole cohesive view.  If we can learn how to do this successfully, we can show how UX Design is so much more than lipstick on a pig.

Bio

With almost fifteen years of experience as an interaction designer and user researcher, with a focus on user-centered design methods, Traci has experienced a broad range of work practices. At Oracle, Traci is responsible for helping to define the customer experience for a new Cloud Commerce Product. While working as a consultant for almost ten years, she worked on both enterprise and consumer projects across a variety of industries and domains. Through her UXmatters column, Dramatic Impact, Traci hopes to infuse aspects of theatrical theory and practice into her design practice and bring a more empathetic and user-centered focus to her work. Traci holds an M.A. in Theater Education from Emerson and a B.S. in Communications Media from Fitchburg State College.

Evening Schedule

6:30 – 7:00 Networking over pizza and beverages
7:00 – 8:30 Meeting
8:30 – 9:00 CHI Dessert and more networking!

Monthly Sponsors

Thank you to our generous sponsors. Interested in sponsoring BostonCHI? Let us know!

IBM Research Cambridge is hosting us and providing pizza.

Vitamin T is sponsoring dessert.

Getting to the event

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IBM Research Cambridge
1 Rogers Street
Cambridge, MA

Applying Human Factors in Medical Software Development

  • Michael Wiklund, General Manager of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) at UL–Wiklund and Jon Tilliss, UL–Wiklund’s Design Director
  • Tuesday, November 10, 2015 at 6:30pm
  • At Constant Contact, 1601 Trapelo Road, Waltham, MA
  • Please register. It helps us and our hosts plan.

Michael_Wiklund headshot 2014      Jon_Tilliss

Abstract

Since its inception in 1982, the SIGCHI community seems to have been chiefly concerned with business-related and personal software applications, and more recently with myriad types of websites. Over the years, members have shared insights about making user interactions with software products more effective, efficient, and satisfying. Only occasionally has product safety been a concern, noting that the harms that could arise from usability problems and use errors have rarely fit the personal injury category. But, safety is the primary concern when it comes to designing today’s expanding array of healthcare-related software, such as electronic medical records used in hospitals and physician’s’ offices, smartphone applications that help users monitor and treat medical conditions, websites that track therapy compliance, and software embedded in capital equipment such as telemetry systems. In fact, regulators require that developers apply human factors engineering rigorously to patient safety-related software. The presenters, who have worked on such software products for many years, will summarize the regulators’ expectations pertaining to different software products and how best to meet them. For instance, they will discuss how to define user interface requirements and then proceed to validate that a software product meets them with sufficient rigor to satisfy the USFDA. They will also share their insights on the movement to ensure the safe use of electronic health records by applying many of the same techniques that have been used for years to ensure the safety of medical devices.

Slides

Bios

Michael Wiklund is General Manager of human factors engineering (HFE) at UL–Wiklund. The UL business unit delivers HFE consulting services to the medical device, scientific instrument, and laboratory equipment industries. He has over 30 years of experience in human factors engineering, much of which has focused on medical technology development. He is a certified human factors specialist and licensed professional engineer. He is author, co-author, and editor of several books on human factors, including a recent one titled Usability Testing of Medical Devices. He is one of the primary authors of today’s most pertinent AAMI and IEC standards and guidelines on human factors engineering. As Professor of the Practice at Tufts University, he teaches courses on human factors in medical technology and software user interface design.

Jon Tilliss serves as UL–Wiklund’s Design Director/USA. He has designed user interfaces and instructional materials for a wide variety of therapeutic and diagnostic devices, laboratory equipment, and consumer products. His usability research efforts have included observing complex medical products in actual use, interviewing prospective users regarding new device requirements, and leading both formative and summative usability test efforts to assess product safety and usability. He is co-author of Summative Usability Testing of Medical Devices (AAMI Horizons, 2010) and frequently guest lectures in courses on human factors and software user interface design at Tufts University.

Evening Schedule

6:30 – 7:00 Networking over pizza and beverages
7:00 – 8:30 Meeting
8:30 – 9:00 CHI Dessert and more networking!

Monthly Sponsors

Thank you to our generous sponsors. If you’re interested in sponsoring BostonCHI, please let us know.

Constant Contact is hosting us and providing pizza.

Vitamin T is sponsoring dessert.

Getting to the event

ConstantContact

Constant Contact
1601 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02451

A research & design community making technology work for people